Fiction · Historical Fiction · Julia P · Name in Title · Re-telling

Mr. Rochester | by Sarah Shoemaker

Mr. Rochester

Mr. Rochester by Sarah Shoemaker
(Grand Central Publishing, 2017, 453 pages)

I will always love¬†Jane Eyre (it’s even my default search when I have to test out the library catalog or a database ūüėČ ). It’s a classic that never gets old. I’ve read a number of Eyre-inspired novels that had something of a moment over the past couple years. This one takes a different approach in attempting to offer Edward Rochester’s back-story to better understand him. Shoemaker did a great job capturing the language and essence of Bronte’s world.

I was really into it at the beginning but the end of the book felt a bit rushed to me. Arguably, this was a text meant to provide Rochester’s origin story so it makes sense that most of the novel focused on his life pre-Jane. However, given the nature of this novel’s readership, it would have been nice to have a little more of the Jane/Edward relationship fleshed out. Even with that caveat, I think fans of¬†Jane Eyre will appreciate this novel. Despite its “high” page count it was a relatively quick read.

3/5 stars

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Essays · Julia P · Memoir · Non-Fiction · Quick Read!

Tell Me More | by Kelly Corrigan

Tell Me More by Kelly Corrigan

Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say
by Kelly Corrigan
(Penguin Random House, 2018, 240 pages)

This was my first time reading Corrigan’s work and I really enjoyed her style. I’ll certainly be picking up her previous titles. The content of this book was just what I needed to read. It’s all about the power of language and reflecting to think of how to act in various situations. Corrigan is able to use humor throughout the book, but there are also some heavy and emotional moments as she lets the reader into her life and explains how it is she came to the realization of what needs to be said and why.

This was a heartfelt and valuable book. I’m glad it found its way into my reading rotation.

4/5 stars

Advance Reader Copy (ARC) · Autobiography · Essays · Julia P · Non-Fiction · Race · Women

This Will Be My Undoing | by Morgan Jerkins

This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America

This Will Be My Undoing by Morgan Jerkins
(Harper Perennial, 2018, 272 pages)

I follow Morgan Jerkins on Twitter (@morganjerkins) and I don’t remember how I first was exposed to her work, but I’m glad for whatever it was that caught my attention. This collection of essays was so well-written and thought-provoking. In the spirit of not reinventing the wheel, below please find the review I posted on Goodreads:

“There are some books that you are content to read but don’t feel like you need to own. This Will Be My Undoing is a book that I’m so glad I read and that I will certainly be going out to buy so it has a permanent place on my shelves. The essays in this book are packed with so much that I know every time I revisit them I’ll come away having gleaned something new.

These essays talk about what it means to exist in this world as a black woman. There is no separating the two. Not only was I nodding along while reading I also found myself tearing up more often than I ever would have imagined I would. There’s so much depth here. It was a fabulous read.”

I definitely recommend (pub. date: January 2018).

4/5 stars

Advance Reader Copy (ARC) · Fiction · Julia P · Name in Title · Poetry · Young Adult

The Poet X | by Elizabeth Acevedo

The Poet X

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
(HarperTeen, 2018, 368 pages)

I was first exposed to Elizabeth Acevedo through her spoken word poetry and I kind of fell in love with her. When I found out she was going to be publishing a book I immediately put it on my “to-read” list so I was¬†pumped when I got the chance to read an advanced reader copy of the title. Unsurprisingly, this is a novel written in verse. The “chapters” are short but pack a punch. It’s easy to want to read quickly but at the same time you appreciate what Acevedo can do with language.

The story follows Xiomara as she enters her Sophomore year in high school. Her mother is pushing her to get confirmed but Xiomara finds herself questioning if she actually has any faith. In the midst of this she’s also finding herself interested in a classmate, even though dating is strictly prohibited. One of the ways Xiomara channels her thoughts and feelings is by writing poetry in the journal her twin got her. This poetry is where she is truly free to express what is really going on within her. When she’s asked to join a slam poetry club as school she starts to realize that maybe she doesn’t need to keep her voice confined to the pages of her journal…

I really enjoyed this and think it will do well when it’s officially released in March. I strongly encourage anyone to check out her work. And if you’re into YA, poetry, and appreciate the written word you’ll tear through this novel.

4/5 stars

Classic · Fiction · In the Library · Sue S · Young Adult

The Catcher in the Rye | by J. D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
(Little, Brown & Company, 1945, 214 pages)

I’m still not sure what the main point of the¬†book¬†was¬†about! It was so different and¬†it seemed like it was a running commentary by the main character. I need to read some reviews. Maybe after I do that I will appreciate it more! I’m am glad I read it, though. I always wondered what it was like.

3/5 stars

Advance Reader Copy (ARC) · Fiction · Julia P · Mystery · Quick Read! · Thriller

The Woman in the Window | by A.J. Finn

The Woman in the Window

The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
(William Morrow, 2018, 448 pages)

I was lucky enough to snag an Advanced Reader Copy of this book (pub. date: January 2018) which I¬†kept hearing about… It lived up to the hype ūüėČ

Here’s the review I posted on Goodreads:

“I can’t believe how much I enjoyed this book. I was sucked in almost immediately. Even though I was tense almost the whole time I was reading it (suspense!) I hated to put it down. This is a quick read recommended to anyone. If you’re a fan of classic suspense films you’ll appreciate The Woman in the Window that much more for all the film references throughout.

There have been comparisons to Girl on the Train¬†but this is of a much higher caliber. I was already recommending it to people before I’d even finished. Even if thrillers/suspense aren’t what you regularly read I think you’ll enjoy this as a good gateway into the genre.”

4/5 stars

Advance Reader Copy (ARC) · Fiction · Julia P · Quick Read!

The Queen of Hearts | by Kimmery Martin

The Queen of Hearts

The Queen of Hearts by Kimmery Martin
(Berkley, 2018, 352 pages)

This forthcoming novel (Feb. 2018) will make you think of Grey’s Anatomy almost the whole time you’re reading it. I was a little wary at the beginning because it felt like the author was trying too hard to show off her literary chops but then the story hooked me and I couldn’t wait to see where Martin was going to go with the book.

Zadie and Emma have been friends since college. They made it through med school and now they’re both living with their families in Charlotte, NC. But when someone from their past turns up in town the women find themselves struggling with how to reconcile a traumatic past with their present lives.

Fans of Liane Moriarty will enjoy this book.

3/5 stars