Fiction · Historical Fiction · Sue S

The Hours Count | by Jillian Cantor

The Hours Count

The Hours Count by Jillian Cantor
(Riverhead Books, 2015, 385 pages)

I enjoyed reading The Hours Count, a historical fiction novel by Jillian Cantor, although the outcome was sad. Some books are hard to get into right away but this one held my attention from the beginning. The story kept me guessing almost to the very end. This is the second book I have read by Jillian Cantor, the first being The Lost LetterI recommend them both, especially if you enjoy historical fiction.  Below is the description from Goodreads:

On June 19, 1953, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were executed for conspiring to commit espionage. The day Ethel was first arrested in 1950, she left her two young sons with a neighbor, and she never came home to them again. Brilliantly melding fact and fiction, Jillian Cantor reimagines the life of that neighbor, and the life of Ethel and Julius, an ordinary-seeming Jewish couple who became the only Americans put to death for spying during the Cold War.

A few years earlier, in 1947, Millie Stein moves with her husband, Ed, and their toddler son, David, into an apartment on the eleventh floor in Knickerbocker Village on New York’s Lower East Side. Her new neighbors are the Rosenbergs. Struggling to care for David, who doesn’t speak, and isolated from other “normal” families, Millie meets Jake, a psychologist who says he can help David, and befriends Ethel, also a young mother. Millie and Ethel’s lives as friends, wives, mothers, and neighbors entwine, even as chaos begins to swirl around the Rosenbergs and the FBI closes in. Millie begins to question her own husband’s political loyalty and her marriage, and whether she can trust Jake and the deep connection they have forged as they secretly work with David. Caught between these two men, both of whom have their own agendas, and desperate to help her friends, Millie will find herself drawn into the dramatic course of history.

As Millie—trusting and naive—is thrown into a world of lies, intrigue, spies and counterspies, she realizes she must fight for what she believes, who she loves, and what is right.

3.5/5 stars

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Fiction · Sue S

The Forgotten Road | by Richard Paul Evans

The Forgotten Road

The Forgotten Road by Richard Paul Evans
(Simon Schuster, 2018, 272 pages)

The Forgotten Road is the second book in the Broken Road Series by Richard Paul Evans.

Below is the Goodreads description:

Chicago celebrity and successful pitchman Charles James is supposed to be dead. Everyone believes he was killed in a fiery plane crash. But thanks to a remarkable twist of fate, he’s very much alive and ready for a second chance at life—and love. Narrowly escaping death has brought Charles some clarity: the money, the fame, the fast cars—none of it was making him happy. The last time he was happy—truly happy—was when he was married to his ex-wife Monica, before their connection was destroyed by his ambition and greed.

Charles decides to embark on an epic quest: He will walk the entire length of Route 66, from Chicago to California, where he hopes to convince Monica to give him another shot. Along the way, Charles is immersed in the deep and rich history of one of America’s most iconic highways. But the greater journey he finds is the one he takes in his heart as he meets people along the road who will change his perspective on the world. But will his transformation be enough to earn redemption?

I found this second book in the series to be very similar to The Walk Series which was also written by Richard Paul Evans. I honestly was a little bored reading the first half of The Forgotten Road with all the little known facts about Route 66 in each town that Charles James walked. The story did get more interesting after Charles began meeting people on his journey on Route 66 to California. I didn’t realize that Route 66 starts in Chicago and ends in Santa Monica, California. Now I am looking forward to reading the third book which doesn’t yet have a release date.

3.5/5 stars

Autobiography · Memoir · Non-Fiction · Sue S

Madison Park | by Eric L. Motley

Madison Park: A Place of Hope

Madison Park: A Place of Hope by Eric L. Motley
(Zondervan, 2017, 304 pages)

Madison Park: A Place of Hope is a memoir written by Eric L. Motley. I really enjoyed learning about the author’s life. He grew up in Madison Park in Alabama. Madison Park is a rural southern community whose founding father and namesake is Eli Madison. Eric came from humble beginnings and was raised by his grandparents.

Eric’s grandparents and some of the residents of the community did everything possible so that he could get a college education. From Eric’s grandparents buying books for him to learn from to neighbors dropping off classical music records for him to listen to, Eric had many people in the community, church, and school impart many lessons and wisdom. Below is the description from Goodreads:

Welcome to Madison Park, a small community in Alabama founded by freed slaves in 1880. And meet Eric Motley, a native son who came of age in this remarkable place where constant lessons in self-determination, hope, and unceasing belief in the American dream taught him everything he needed for his journey to the Oval Office as a Special Assistant to President George W. Bush.

Eric grew up among people whose belief was to “give” and never turn away from your neighbor’s need. There was Aunt Shine, the goodly matriarch who cared so much about young Motley’s schooling that she would stand up in a crowded church and announce Eric’s progress or his shortcomings. There was Old Man Salery, who secretly siphoned gasoline from his beat-up car into the Motley’s tank at night. There were Motley’s grandparents, who bought books for Eric they couldn’t afford, spending the last of their seed money. And there was Reverend Brinkley, a man of enormous faith and simple living. It was said that whenever the Reverend came your way, light abounded. Life in Madison Park wasn’t always easy or fair, and Motley reveals personal and heartbreaking stories of racial injustice and segregation. But Eric shows how the community taught him everything he needed to know about love and faith.

This charming, engaging, and deeply inspiring memoir will help you remember that we can create a world of shared values based on love and hope. It is a story that reveals the amazing power of faith in God and each other. If you’re in search of hope during troubled times, look no further than Madison Park.

5/5 stars

Fiction · Relationships · Sue S

Snow Day | by Billy Coffey

Snow Day

Snow Day by Billy Coffey
(Faith Words, 2010, 195 pages)

I enjoyed this novel and how throughout the character’s day off work due to a snow storm he realizes that he is truly grateful for his family and the life that he has around him.

Description from Google Books:

“In this debut novel, Peter is a simple man who lives by a simple truth–a person gains strength by leaning on his constants. To him, those constants are the factory where he works, the family he loves, and the God who sustains him. But when news of job cuts comes against the backdrop of an unexpected snowstorm, his life becomes filled with far more doubts than certainties.
With humor and a gift for storytelling, Billy Coffey brings you along as he spends his snow day encountering family, friends, and strangers of his small Virginia town. All have had their own battles with life’s storms. Some have found redemption. Others are still seeking it. But each one offers a piece to the puzzle of why we must sometimes suffer loss, and each one will help Peter find a greater truth–our lives are made beautiful not by our big moments, but our little ones.”

3.5/5 stars

Classic · Fiction · In the Library · Sue S · Young Adult

The Catcher in the Rye | by J. D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
(Little, Brown & Company, 1945, 214 pages)

I’m still not sure what the main point of the book was about! It was so different and it seemed like it was a running commentary by the main character. I need to read some reviews. Maybe after I do that I will appreciate it more! I’m am glad I read it, though. I always wondered what it was like.

3/5 stars