Andrew S · Design · Fashion · History · Non-Fiction · Quick Read!

Fortuny | by Delphine Desveaux

Image result for fortuny delphine desveaux

Fortuny (Fashion Memoir) by Delphine Desveaux
(Thames and Hudson, 1998, 80 pages)

Textiles – combining east and west.

4/5 stars

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Design · For the Home · Julia P · Non-Fiction

The Perfectly Imperfect Home | by Deborah Needleman

The Perfectly Imperfect Home

The Perfectly Imperfect Home: How to Decorate and Live Well
by Deborah Needleman; illustrated by Virginia Johnson
(Potter Style, 2011, 256 pages)

My interest in interior decorating continues! The message of Needleman’s book is in line with how I feel – I want my place to look nice and put together, but I also want it to feel cozy and to quickly make people feel at home. Needleman offers tips on things you can do at home to make your place reflect who you are while also making it chic AND comfortable. The book is broken down in chapters that look at various elements like lighting and “cozifications” mixed in with chapters that are broken down by room. I got some good tips from her, especially when it comes to things like lighting and seating arrangements.

The Perfectly Imperfect Home didn’t offer as much new information as I’d hoped it would, it mostly just supported the mindset I already work with. That being said, this would make for a good introductory text if you’re looking at exploring changes at home. It will give you ideas while also helping you see that the changes don’t have to be huge to have an impact on how your home feels.

Design · For the Home · Julia P · Non-Fiction

Remodelista | by Julie Carson, with the editors of Remodelista

Remodelista

Remodelista: A Manual for the Considered Home by Julie Carson, with the editors of Remodelista
(Artisan, 2013, 400 pages)

My design kick continues… The Remodelista book developed out of the website, Remodelista.com. This is one of the top sites for those interested in redesigning their homes and seeking out inspiration (if you haven’t already you should also check out Houzz.com!). The book is set up in chunks. It starts with “Twelve Houses We Love” that looks at the interiors of 12 different houses from California to England. You see how people have made their space their own and get ideas and inspiration from this section. We then move into some short chapters on kitchens and bathrooms since those tend to be the spaces people remodel most frequently and it’s helpful to get some insight. The book then jumps into “Design Ideas” – here things that can be done in a DIY fashion are highlighted to show you that it’s possible to change your home without doing a complete remodel and bringing in experts. The book ends with “The Remodelista 100,” a breakdown of 100 objects that the Remodelista editors love with the reasons why and where the objects can be obtained. A thorough list of “Resources We Swear By” is provided at the end and is broken down by resource type (paint, flooring, etc.)

This was a good book but the design aesthetic isn’t quite me so I don’t think I got as much out of it as someone else would. There’s an emphasis on mixing high and low materials (think Ikea mixed with $8000 couches) and clean lines with very little clutter. I personally prefer a homier feel, but I was still able to find inspiration with this book (and I’ll admit that the aesthetic highlighted is a very calming one) and I wrote down a TON of resources and websites that I want to check out (hopefully they’re not out of my price range). Check out the Remodelista site and see if the design aesthetic matches with yours, if so you’ll enjoy this book 🙂 FYI, actress Julianne Moore is a huge fan of the site and she wrote the forward to the book.