Death · Medicine · Philosophy · Rebecca

Mortality | by Christopher Hitchens

hitch

Mortality by Christopher Hitchens
(Twelve, 2012, 104 pages)

In this book Christopher Hitchens’ writes about his fight to be one of the small percentage that would overcome his diagnosis.  This famous orator is struck down with esophageal cancer when he begins his American book tour.  Hitchens’ refers to his last months as “living dyingly”.  I found this book jolting at times.  It was hard to read about the amount of pain involved in his life the last 19 months.  He is realistic about his diagnosis, however, he retains a hopeful enthusiasm for alternative treatments.

He points out how simple questions can be taken so literally when one is faced with a limited number of days left in their life.  A question, such as, I’ll be in town next week will you be around to meet?, takes on a whole new depth in this context.

His wife, Carol Blue writes an afterword in the book recounting some of their “flawless” days.  She misses the sound of his voice, the variety of tones that his voice made throughout the day – from the first waking low octaves to the night time whispers.

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